Four-cylinder Jaguar F-Type sounds better than expected

The Jaguar F-Type SVR produces one of the most evil/awesome exhaust notes one could possibly conjure up.

How Jaguar managed to get a portal to Hell in the SVR’s exhaust will remain a mystery.

The regular old V6? Still sounds pretty wicked – in fact it puts a lot of V8s to shame. Its roar, coupled with its spits of bangbangbang and rorty crackles, sound like someone’s trying to blow up a bowl of Rice Bubbles.

So, what happens when you lob two cylinders off and straighten ’em out? Jaguar’s four-pot F-Type sounds nowhere near as wild as its older brothers, but it doesn’t sound terrible. In fact, it sounds… nice?

While Jaguar attempts to focus our attention on the ride quality and improved handling that comes with a lighter front-end, it’s probably not going to escape criticism for turning its beast of a sports coupe into an (albeit quick) turbo-four.

That’s not very ‘Jag’. However, with 221kW at 5500rpm, 400Nm from 1500rpm, and a 0-100km/h time of 5.4 seconds, it’s got enough performance potential to keep most people happy.

2018 Jaguar F-Type four-cylinderIt’s also relatively cheap for a Jag. At $107,300 plus on-road costs, it’s about $12K cheaper than the manual V6.

The confusion that accompanies a four-cylinder coupe priced over $100K is that it’s got incredibly competent alternatives, which all appear to have an on-paper advantage.

Putting aside the obvious rival, the similarly turbo four-pot Porsche 718 Cayman, there’s the more powerful Mercedes-AMG C43 Coupe, the quicker Audi TT S, more affordable Infiniti Q60 and BMW M2, which is just…more.

2018 Jaguar F-Type four-cylinder staticCan the four-pot F-Type fight back with sharp dynamics and those catwalk looks? We’ll find out later this year.

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